Posts tagged ‘Guest Bath’

November 10, 2011

Handling It

by Cait

This post goes out anyone (else) who has ever gone completely bat-shit crazy during a reno. I have been searching for the perfect handles for the guest bathroom since April.

I shared the photo above in July, but what I didn’t share was what I went though to find them.

The top left are the handles I have plans for, the bottom right are ones that are destined for our Etsy shop (unless someone sees something they like), the top right I’m not sure what to do with (the metal ones will probably end up on Etsy or some various project), and the bottom left are miscellaneous ones that came with some of the other ones I ordered.

one of our Etsy bottle stoppers, along with the stainless stoppers we use

These arrived today (for $15 with a boat load of other plumbing junk we’ll never use) and I was hoping they would work with the handle that arrived last week (the ones in this post; which I forgot to show with all the others). They don’t look right together, but the ones above are starting to grow on me, so we’ll probably use them for the outdoor shower.

I did find what I think I’m looking to use in the hall bathroom though. I Googled “1950s faucet” and ran across this post on Retro Renovation which led me to FaucetPartsPlus.com, where I found some American Standard cross handles that look like they will match the one I already have. $18.99. Sold.

for the hall bath (I saw these escutcheons for $11.99 at Ace today, mine were 3 for $18)

While I’m being honest, here is the rest of my escutcheon haul:

bottom right from Period Bath and the rest of them came with handles

I scored some great deals on all of this, especially when you consider how much there is. Now I’m just trying to pair things down.

Have you gone through an equally long search looking for the perfect touch of a project?

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May 20, 2011

Guest Bath Redux: More Inspiration & Features

by Cait

As I’ve mentioned, I’ve been pinning a lot of things on Pinterest. When I found this bathroom I pretty much fell in love with it. And then I sent it to Robert who said “That is one of the most amazing baths I think I’ve ever seen”.  Score.

from Better Homes & Gardens

Keen observers will notice that this somewhat similar to what I said we wanted. White tile, lots of light, blue-ish walls, etc. I also really, really love those shelves.

Our tub is like the one above, and we both agree that the solid surface top looks better than how it was previously tiled. Now the next question is: what do we use as a counter surface? We’re considering Paperstone, recycled glass counters and concrete. Anyone have experience with any of those? I know that Kara Paslay and her husband DIY concrete counters and tables a lot, but I don’t know how keen I am to try that.

from re-nest

Another good thing about using a counter is that it would provide a small lip at the edge, which is good because we wanted to try to DIY a tub tip-out. That’s right, I said tub tip-out. The image above is The Stowaway made by GW International, but I think we could probably rig something up using bead board and wire baskets. (Hopefully without those large, obvious handles, too.)

Speaking of hidden storage, I love this idea from Donna DuFresne Design. We’re using bead board on part of the walls, so maybe we could make this work with some of those cabinet hinges that open when you push on the door? (I know there has a technical term for that… it’s escaping me.)

 from Donna DuFresne Design 

 What about y’all? Do you prefer hidden storage or open shelving? Freestanding tubs, apron tubs, or garden tubs?

May 16, 2011

Guest Bath Redux: Demo Day 3

by Cait

Alternate Title A: The One In Which I Finally Get My Outdoor Bathtub; Alternate Title B: The One In Which Freckles is Toilet Trained.

Occasionally we demo things around here, when I’m not pinning. And I’m using the loose sense of the word “we” here, the one that means “I once again stood outside the window and retrieved pieces that needed to go in the truck bed” while Robert and Ryan demoed.

our once-upon-a-time jacuzzi tub (no, we didn’t convert it)

Alternate Title B comes from the fact that the toilet is now not that far from the tub, and Freckles immediately relieved himself on it when I let the dogs out…

See that plywood at the bottom left? That’s an exterior T1-11 patch that Ryan removed when this whole thing began. Also, you can see how some of the studs are moldy and need to be replaced. That was probably going to happen anyhow because that wall needed more support (it was a bit alarming the way the entire exterior wall shook when Ryan was ripping the drywall down). The rest of the studs look pretty good, so that’s promising.

Long time blog readers may recognize this view from when we removed the medicine cabinet, plus a bit more destruction. The sink still needs to come out and get donated to ReStore, and I plan to ask Ryan if he thinks it’s possible to put in a 24″ pocket door while we’re already down to studs.

From here we need to clear the rest of the demo debris off the floor, remove the sink, finish ripping out the last bits of tile (including floor tile) and drywall, and then reassess. Reassess the layout, the game plan from there on out, the budget, etc.

Oh, and assuming we get through this 1) alive and 2) without any debt (we’re trying to pay for it all in cash or gift cards) we may tackle a mini makeover in the hall bathroom. But we also may take some time to do more low-key projects.

May 10, 2011

Guest Bath Redux: Demo Days 1&2

by Cait

First, a Public Service Announcement. If you are going to demo a bathroom: buy a respirator. If anyone even hints at the word mold: buy a respirator. If you have asthma like me: buy a respirator. Please do not just use a paper mask or a painting respirator. The one below is a charcoal cartridge, particulate & fungal respirator. I promise I was not paid by anyone to say this, I don’t even know the brand on mine (the photo looks like it says Survivair, Inc – I just know Robert bought it at his work, which is an auto parts store).

Ok, now with that out of the way we can get on to the fun demo photos.We probably could have done this all in one day over a weekend (or a very long evening) but we wanted to take our time.

Day 1

raise your hand if you think they followed the instructions on the box after sealing it in tile

This is pretty much our stopping point for Day 1. Though only 30 minutes of work, somehow after discovering several layers of drywall (some not rated for use in bathrooms), a couple of boxes of baking soda, and far more foul things than I want to think about or recount, we decided to call it quits. Especially since we wanted to make a run to Publix before they closed. But at least we got the process down. We sealed the door in plastic, went to Publix, and relaxed in front of Criminal Minds. Hey, Derek Morgan, apparently you own rental property, want to help with my bathroom?

Day 2, my view

Day 2, my view other side

On Day 2, since Robert only bought one respirator (though he’ll be getting a second one) and I smashed my finger (it’s fine), Robert volunteered me to stand outside and throw the debris that he passed out the window into the truck bed.

Day 2, R’s view

you mean you don’t store your unused tile inside the tub surround?

more surprises

Apparently the cool thing to do during a small bathroom overhaul is to plug the jacuzzi jets and leave wires where they can be exposed to water. Awesome. (Not that I like jacuzzi tubs anyhow.)

After we filled the truck bed we decided to call it an evening and Robert took the debris to dump in his old job’s dumpster. (Hey, the manager said he could!)

I know that it looks like we’re going about this in a strange way; we’re kind of doing this in stages as opposed to completely smashing everything and shoveling the debris out the window. Most people would probably have yanked the sink out first, but we still have to shut the plumbing to that off (pretty sure the under-sink valves don’t work). We’ll probably shut it off at the street, remove the sink, and cap the pipes soon because we’d like to donate the sink and toilet to ReStore this weekend. Also we’d prefer to salvage the tub if possible. If we can’t salvage the tub we’ll probably donate that as well and try to find a semi-cheap fiberglass tub. Here’s hoping we can salvage it.

Today the stupid cabinet that I hated came out, some of the drywall came out (it would have had to come out anyhow thanks to them wallpapering directly over drywall to the point where you can’t remove it) and some insulation. After everything is completely demoed we’ll treat the walls, replumb, replace the insulation and put up new, moisture-rated drywall and backer board. Then honestly it will probably sit for a while, but it really depends on how expensive all the tile is.

If y’all could please suggest the best mold-killing treatments that would be great. I hear the way to go with wood and drywall is 1 cup Borax to 1 gallon of water, but I’m open to suggestions. Oh and greener insulation would be great, too. Where can you buy the stuff made from recycled blue jeans, and how much is it?

May 3, 2011

Guest Bath Redux: Features

by Cait

Y’all know I love me some build-in shelves, so in discussing how we want to plan out the bathroom I immediately thought about Kara Paslay’s bathroom (umm, also, her bathroom floor? and those chevron towels? yes please.) Then I thought about the build-in shown in one of YHL’s House Crashing tours.


Left from Kara Paslay Designs, right from YHL

I think a build-in would look really nice next to the sink, especially something sleek like the ones above. Robert (and Ryan) and I have already discussed the possibility of changing the current layout of the bathroom when we renovate it, spurred on by the fact that the sink and toilet were already pretty close together aaaaand then we bought a larger sink. Apparently when you rip everything down to studs it’s easy to change things like that. Who knew? </sarcasm>

I was thinking of making the build-in behind the current door and keeping the sink and toilet side by side, but with the larger sink I think it would really work best to move the toilet to the other side of the door.  If we do that though, I want either a pocket door or a barn door, because I don’t want the door to open right into the toilet (or the sink, if swap the hinges around).

Left & middle from Houzz ideabook, right from Rambling Renovators

I love the two door style of the lefthand picture a lot, and it might work best with the wall widths that we have to deal with. The rustic nature of the middle one is amazing, but something that rustic would probably be too much with the clean lines of the bathroom we’re planning. You might wonder why I threw that righthand picture in there when obviously I just said that some sort of sliding door would be best, given the small size of the bathroom. It’s because I’m tricksy like that I found a lot of “normal” doors made into barn doors while searching on Houzz and I think that we could do something like that with a door like the above right.

from Whisper Wood Cottage on Houzz

And then, sometimes I think about all the things I’d love to incorpurate into the guest bath and I envision Tim Gunn popping out of the woodwork going “that’s a lot of look”.

May 2, 2011

Guest Bath Redux: Budget Tracking

by Cait

After planning out what we want to do in the guest bath, I went to ReStore on Saturday to see what they had in the way of tile (sadly no subway tile), and ended up finding a couple of things for the bathroom. I snapped up 8 of these metal cross handles for 75 cents each, and the shelf was $9.


My dad texted me about the time I was picking these up, so after a bit of looking at $20 sinks, we grabbed lunch, made a brief stop at another store where they treated me to exact bathroom shelf that they bought me for my birthday last year (and later returned because the size didn’t work with the bathroom layout at the time) for $9. I forgot to take a picture of it, but it’s the style most often referred to as “train shelf”.

$20 sinks (sorry for the iPhone pictures, I snapped them for reference)

At the outlet store, I found a white, chair height, elongated bowl, dual flush toilet, a shower head, and a larger $20 sink with more space to put soap/contact cases than the ReStore ones.


I have picked up a couple of other odds and ends online, as well. I bought a faucet spout (which we’re hoping to use with two of the cross handles from ReStore, otherwise I’ll buy a couple of matching Delta faucet handles), a shower arm, and a shower diverter escutcheon (which was a major splurge at $65 from Period Bath, but it makes me laugh).

For those of you playing along at home, that brings out total for fixtures to $326. We do still need …. well, everything else, but we’re feeling pretty good about how we’re doing on budget so far.

Next up? Tracking down a tub spout (Ryan has sensibly forbidden me from using Glacier Bay for the tub/shower because they tend to fail and require ripping out the wall. Which.. yeah, no thank you.), DensGuard, green board, tile, grout, bead board (for the walls other than the shower surround), etc etc etc. Just thinking about it makes my head hurt.

April 29, 2011

Guest Bath Redux

by Cait

So you saw how our evening went last night. Now we’re talking about what we want to do to start over.

I am slightly obsessed with Houzz (you can see my Bathroom Inspiration ideabook here), and we had already pretty much decided what we wanted when we found this picture:

from houzz

I love the idea of white subway tile for the shower walls & behind the sink. I want hex tile for the floor, but we are debating between the kind with black accents and just plain white with black grout. The walls will be painted the same color that they are now, Valspar Summer Sorbet. We hope to get the same faucet we have for the other bathroom ($25 by Glacier Bay), a wall hung sink (possibly one from ReStore, but the one below is a $32 Glacier Bay) and a new, chair height, elongated-bowl, eco-friendly toilet (one shown is $118 Glacier Bay with good reivews). We haven’t decided on a tub faucet yet, but the shower head is the one we were considering for the outdoor shower, which is $35 from Glacier Bay, and we’d buy or make a 90-degree arm for it. Our ceiling will be white (and flat! goodbye terrible popcorn!), and the tile won’t go that far up the walls.

We have not been paid or perked by Home Depot or Glacier bay, we just really like that brand of plumbing fixtures for the quality and price!

April 28, 2011

Hammer Time

by Cait

You ever just have one of those days?

PS- Jane, the toilet-scape is gone. Can’t say I miss it much.

April 28, 2011

Water Works

by Cait

Some of you may have seen on Facebook, but last night our hot water handle on the guest room tub decided to stop working. I have no explanation for this other than the fact that the cold water handle hasn’t ever worked since we bought the house (as demonstrated by tub filling ghetto-style above), and now whatever happened to it seems to have happened to the hot water handle. We hadn’t used that hot water handle since Sunday, but we had used the hot water in general, and everything seemed fine.

Then Robert was washing out the coffee pot to make iced coffee for this morning and noticed the water pressure was low. He assumed I had flushed a toilet or something in the back of the house. Until he realized the toilet wasn’t running. There was, however, the noise of running water coming from inside the wall in the guest bath. And the hot water heater was filling and refilling.

Cue slight panic. Cue texting Ryan “Big water leak”. Cue flipping unlabeled breakers on the main panel and the subpanel in the laundry room like mad trying to shut the hot water off.

Finally we found the correct breaker, which was thankfully isolated on the main panel. I labeled it with Sharpie, Robert took a cold shower, and Ryan texted back this morning with a plan on how to fix the problem. (And an unneccesary apology for not answering sooner. Dude, had it been life-threatening to anything but our utilities bill we’d have called. Repeatedly.)

And so, amid plans to cutting through the T1-11 (so thankful it’s not stucco like the rest of the house. yet.) outside the bathroom to cap/repair the pipe(s), and terrifying thoughts of mold & the other joys that go hand in hand with things like this, I am dreaming of the day that we have new plumbing fixtures (that work!) in that bathroom. And maybe beadboard, in case we have to go through the top side, too. (Plus it would cover the ugly tile! Hooray!) Did you know they make synthetic/PVC beadboard for shower surrounds? I didn’t. Sadly it’s $500 a panel. Can we just seal the regular stuff really well? These are questions I plan to pounce on Ryan with later, because I so don’t want to tile anything. Ever.

from Pottery Barn

We have about $0 to spend on quick-fixes and fixtures, but I would love a tub set similar to the Pottery Barn one above. You know we like cross handles, and you’ve seen our kitchen faucet, so it shouldn’t be any surprise that we want something pretty traditional for this bathroom, too.  I’m kind of thinking we’ll go with this set when we can, assuming we can just not use the hand sprayer bit. I would love this one from my plumbing-boyfriend Glacier Bay if it was a. less money and b. satin nickel.

Oh, and in case you haven’t guessed, the outdoor shower plumbing is being postponed. The $75 cast iron utility sink that I found locally at a salvage yard probably is too (assuming their online catalog is even up to date, I don’t think the message they left Robert mentioned the sink). Such is life.

PS- I already mentioned that Robert&Ryan have a plan of action, but how thankful am I that Emiley&Kyle live two minutes away and my parents live two blocks way in case we need to wash clothes or want to shower with hot water before we get things fixed? So glad to have friends&family to lean on when things get rough!

September 15, 2010

Housiversary

by Cait

Today marks one year of home ownership here at Hernando House, and we thought we’d celebrate with a few simple things that make us happy (since we’re not a big enough blog for sponsored giveaways… yet?).

First up, we answered our soap question when we learned from a little Googling and a Facebook tip (thanks, Susan!) that we could save some dough thanks to a promotion at the Mrs Meyer’s website.  We stocked up on dish soap, hand soap, a room freshening spray and counter top spray, all in our favorite Geranium scent.

Second, my sweet hubby brought my shoe cabinet into the bedroom (yeah, it had been lounging on the porch, we move quickly like that) for me. And lastly, I did the following.

(Yes, we have to add cold water with the shower head.  But not to worry, that just means we have more projects to do later.)

And on a side note, it’s interesting to us that a lot of our friends also bought or rented out a house and made it a goal to be moved in by their wedding anniversary.

Do you celebrate housiversaries?  We’d love to hear about what you do to celebrate events in your lives!