Posts tagged ‘demo’

November 8, 2011

Guest Bath Redux: It’s Happening Again

by Cait

I got jealous of everyone else in Blogland drywalling, so yesterday I threw down the challenge to Robert. I think he got into the spirit of it (or he’s excited about his new respirator), because this morning he said “I may clear the bathroom before you get home.” To which I replied “Ok, make sure to take pictures!”

We’re picking up where we left off in May, so if you don’t hear from us for awhile, you might want to send the bloodhounds.

June 14, 2011

Reclaimed Brick Patio: Day 3 and Still No Jackhammer

by Cait

I’m finally back with our progress pictures. But first, a before.

Weird Concrete

This is how it looked after the weekend’s hard work.

on Sunday

Yesterday it started pouring around right before we left work and because we had zero desire to use metal (and power) tools in the thunder & lightning we decided to take the night off. (Well, that and plus it kept pouring all night long). When I got home from work today Robert had it looking like this.

earlier today

We were planning on renting a jackhammer, but Robert decided he wanted to try a few more things first. What he ended up doing was drill a few holes into the thick concrete in a line and then sledgehammer the area where he drilled; apparently it works sort of like perforating paper. Then he was able to use the pry bar to further snap things along the crack that was created. Mostly I think he wanted to get all the way through without a jackhammer because he’s stubborn, but that hadn’t worked we definitely would have rented one this weekend.

While he was finishing that up I started tackling the wavy tile.


note the two types of tile, misaligned

I used two hammers in what I like the call the Jamie Hyneman Method  (except I used a rubber headed hammer instead of  two metal ones. Yes, that’s a “wubber headed hammer”, Mom). The plan it to rent a saw (what Robert refers to as “the regular one”, not a wet saw) to score a straight line about where the tile I have yet to remove ends and  as far down as the Frog Tape (which you can see in the first tile picture), which is right before that pile of rock I’ve been pulling out of the yard. Then we’ll retile with some terra cotta tile we got from my parents.

free terra cotta tile!

We’re hoping to use the square tiles in the back for next to the porch, because we have a plan for those lighter colored rectangular ones. Maybe you can guess what I want to do with them if you keep my love of exposed brick in mind.

Any guesses?

June 13, 2011

Reclaimed Brick Patio: Labor Pains

by Cait

Alternate title: The One In Which I Suggest We Change Our Blog Name to “Illegal Dumping”

For anyone who follows us on Facebook, you might have seen me talk a bit about the “weird concrete” in our backyard.

weird concrete in all its glory awkwardness

When Robert got home from work on Saturday we (meaning he) took a sledgehammer to the weird concrete and I loaded the pieces into the back of the truck. (Fun fact: When we put up our fence we didn’t plan on it, but his Ranger justbarely fits through the gate into the backyard. Granted it then got covered in some sort of sticky nastiness that dripped off our weed-trees, but it washed off ok.) My hamstrings (and I’m assuming Robert’s back and shoulders) want you to know that this process did not go as easily as I would lead you to believe on Facebook.

Saturday’s status update
Sunday’s status update

Sunday morning we resumed the process of trying to break the last three or so feet of concrete out. Forty minutes or so later we said “screw it” and decided to brainstorm while dumping the concrete we had already broken out. (I owe you pictures of that truck-load, I just haven’t pulled them off the memory card yet. Whoops.) While we were tossing our concrete into a dumpster (with the manager’s permission if you want to get technical, though he wasn’t working this time) I joked that we should change out blog name to “Illegal Dumping”.

To wrap things up, the first 22-24 feet of concrete busted out fairly easily because whoever put it down had no idea what they were doing. What we thought was rebar was actually just a couple of long bolts (which we’re guessing were connected to supports for a deck, maybe?) The last bit, the part Robert hammered on for 40 minutes and only managed to chip tiny pieces off of, is an L-shaped area where the long side of the L is the horizontal part in the foreground of the picture above. The concrete there was much thicker, as if they had a lot left over so they just dug deeper and dumped the rest in that area.

We’re thinking about renting a jackhammer for that last part (though Robert just texted me saying he’s still brainstorming other ideas). It’s about $200 cheaper than renting a saw would have been, and it should also help with chiseling up the tile. At the moment our plan for the tiled area is to square it off with (groan) more concrete and then re-tile the area using some terra cotta tiles we scored from the shed on some family property. In theroy it should coordinate well with the brick patio, cross your fingers for us!

Anyone else do anything house projects that left them sore this Monday morning?

May 16, 2011

Guest Bath Redux: Demo Day 3

by Cait

Alternate Title A: The One In Which I Finally Get My Outdoor Bathtub; Alternate Title B: The One In Which Freckles is Toilet Trained.

Occasionally we demo things around here, when I’m not pinning. And I’m using the loose sense of the word “we” here, the one that means “I once again stood outside the window and retrieved pieces that needed to go in the truck bed” while Robert and Ryan demoed.

our once-upon-a-time jacuzzi tub (no, we didn’t convert it)

Alternate Title B comes from the fact that the toilet is now not that far from the tub, and Freckles immediately relieved himself on it when I let the dogs out…

See that plywood at the bottom left? That’s an exterior T1-11 patch that Ryan removed when this whole thing began. Also, you can see how some of the studs are moldy and need to be replaced. That was probably going to happen anyhow because that wall needed more support (it was a bit alarming the way the entire exterior wall shook when Ryan was ripping the drywall down). The rest of the studs look pretty good, so that’s promising.

Long time blog readers may recognize this view from when we removed the medicine cabinet, plus a bit more destruction. The sink still needs to come out and get donated to ReStore, and I plan to ask Ryan if he thinks it’s possible to put in a 24″ pocket door while we’re already down to studs.

From here we need to clear the rest of the demo debris off the floor, remove the sink, finish ripping out the last bits of tile (including floor tile) and drywall, and then reassess. Reassess the layout, the game plan from there on out, the budget, etc.

Oh, and assuming we get through this 1) alive and 2) without any debt (we’re trying to pay for it all in cash or gift cards) we may tackle a mini makeover in the hall bathroom. But we also may take some time to do more low-key projects.

May 10, 2011

Guest Bath Redux: Demo Days 1&2

by Cait

First, a Public Service Announcement. If you are going to demo a bathroom: buy a respirator. If anyone even hints at the word mold: buy a respirator. If you have asthma like me: buy a respirator. Please do not just use a paper mask or a painting respirator. The one below is a charcoal cartridge, particulate & fungal respirator. I promise I was not paid by anyone to say this, I don’t even know the brand on mine (the photo looks like it says Survivair, Inc – I just know Robert bought it at his work, which is an auto parts store).

Ok, now with that out of the way we can get on to the fun demo photos.We probably could have done this all in one day over a weekend (or a very long evening) but we wanted to take our time.

Day 1

raise your hand if you think they followed the instructions on the box after sealing it in tile

This is pretty much our stopping point for Day 1. Though only 30 minutes of work, somehow after discovering several layers of drywall (some not rated for use in bathrooms), a couple of boxes of baking soda, and far more foul things than I want to think about or recount, we decided to call it quits. Especially since we wanted to make a run to Publix before they closed. But at least we got the process down. We sealed the door in plastic, went to Publix, and relaxed in front of Criminal Minds. Hey, Derek Morgan, apparently you own rental property, want to help with my bathroom?

Day 2, my view

Day 2, my view other side

On Day 2, since Robert only bought one respirator (though he’ll be getting a second one) and I smashed my finger (it’s fine), Robert volunteered me to stand outside and throw the debris that he passed out the window into the truck bed.

Day 2, R’s view

you mean you don’t store your unused tile inside the tub surround?

more surprises

Apparently the cool thing to do during a small bathroom overhaul is to plug the jacuzzi jets and leave wires where they can be exposed to water. Awesome. (Not that I like jacuzzi tubs anyhow.)

After we filled the truck bed we decided to call it an evening and Robert took the debris to dump in his old job’s dumpster. (Hey, the manager said he could!)

I know that it looks like we’re going about this in a strange way; we’re kind of doing this in stages as opposed to completely smashing everything and shoveling the debris out the window. Most people would probably have yanked the sink out first, but we still have to shut the plumbing to that off (pretty sure the under-sink valves don’t work). We’ll probably shut it off at the street, remove the sink, and cap the pipes soon because we’d like to donate the sink and toilet to ReStore this weekend. Also we’d prefer to salvage the tub if possible. If we can’t salvage the tub we’ll probably donate that as well and try to find a semi-cheap fiberglass tub. Here’s hoping we can salvage it.

Today the stupid cabinet that I hated came out, some of the drywall came out (it would have had to come out anyhow thanks to them wallpapering directly over drywall to the point where you can’t remove it) and some insulation. After everything is completely demoed we’ll treat the walls, replumb, replace the insulation and put up new, moisture-rated drywall and backer board. Then honestly it will probably sit for a while, but it really depends on how expensive all the tile is.

If y’all could please suggest the best mold-killing treatments that would be great. I hear the way to go with wood and drywall is 1 cup Borax to 1 gallon of water, but I’m open to suggestions. Oh and greener insulation would be great, too. Where can you buy the stuff made from recycled blue jeans, and how much is it?

April 28, 2011

Hammer Time

by Cait

You ever just have one of those days?

PS- Jane, the toilet-scape is gone. Can’t say I miss it much.